Your Position: Home > telecaster guitars > 1996 Fender Custom Shop 1951 Nocaster CUNETTO RELIC pre-Telecaster FLAME-NECK!

1996 Fender Custom Shop 1951 Nocaster CUNETTO RELIC pre-Telecaster FLAME-NECK!

  • Price:$5696.68

1996 fender custom shop 1951 nocaster, cunetto relic  john page cert flame-neck!

more large hd photos below description!!

this guitar is among the first & most sought after mid 90's custom shop relics, hand aged by vince cunetto. mr. cunetto is pretty much single handedly responsible for all the craze with "aging", "relic", and "distressing"; basically making a new or newer guitar look and feel like a prized (and astronomically expensive) vintage guitar. beginning in 1995, the very first custom shop relic models were hand-aged by cunetto at his private shop, before fender started in-house aging in summer of 1999. that makes this an extremely early model with a low serial number to match. (read more about "cunetto aging" below). this particular example was put together with some of the finest parts available, and exceeds the standards of even the most exclusive custom shop or masterbuilt models. the thin nitro "nocaster blonde" finish has one of the most authentic aging jobs i've seen; painstaking detail and 17 years of legitimate "life" come together in a way that truly emulates the experience of playing one of the first solid-body guitars ever built!! the neck is also top shelf private stock grade, carved from beautiful flamed maple and coated with a buttery amber-tint nitro (also perfectly aged). you will also notice that the "custom shop" logo is engraved rather than a decal; instantly recognizable as a "cunetto".here is your chance to own a extremely exclusive & realistic 50's relic that has major historical significance in it's own right... * this guitar truly looks, fells & plays like an original 1951 nocaster with just the right amout of wear.  simply put the aged parts and relic work done by mr. cunetto are frighteningly accurate. look at the pick guard and knobs etc.. amazing.
* the pickups truly have that magical 1950's tone & mojo that shaped rock n' roll as we know it! this is the quintessential vintage tone that fender enthusiasts crave! 
* collector-grade condition... everything is 100% original, with no technical or structrural modifications, or repairs. 
* includes original fender custom shop tweed case, certificate of authenticity, cord & strap.

serial # r 1329weight: 7 lbs 6 oz 
limited edition 1951 nocaster relic specs:
? body: premium ash? finish: hand crafted nitrocellulose lacquer "relic" finish in nocaster blonde? neck: 1-piece bolt-on maple? neck shape: '57 style soft "v" shape? fretboard: birdseye maple? fingerboard radius: 9.5"? number of frets: 21? pickups: twisted tele in neck -- hot broadcaster in the bridge? controls: master volume, master tone? switching: 3-way blade switch? bridge: '51 nocaster bridge with 3 brass saddles? machine heads: fender vintage-style nickel? hardware: chrome? pickguard: single-ply black? scale length: 25-1/2" (647.7 mm)? width at nut: 1.650" (42 mm)




*the following is from the fellowship of acoustics website
the fender cunetto story!after over 20 years of playing, building, repairing, buying, selling, trading--basically living for the guitar  vince cunetto is tapped by the fender custom shop to help develop a new concept for the guitar industry and bring it to life. when his prototypes meet with mass approval and new orders mount, he takes a risk and forms a new company to get the ball rolling. as the story goes, vince spends the next four and a half years using his skill and experience on a new project... making new guitars look and feel like their well-worn and well-played predecessors.by may 1999, the work vince and his crew have been doing is taken back "in-house" by fender so cunettos job ends here.. they've shipped over forty-eight hundred (4800) guitars and it's been one sweet ride. vince knows how lucky he's been. he'd seen huge success doing something he'd only dreamed about while growing up. he'd had the chance to do a lot of great work for many of his musical heroes (some of whom are friends today). he'd taken a risk and it had all paid off.today, his name is attached to an entire genre of guitars, and much his to surprise, they've already seem to have become modern collectables.where does a gentleman named vince cunetto fit into this story? at the beginning.the relic (and what would later become the fender time machine series) story begins in 1994. john page is the manager of the fender custom shop. jay black is a custom shop master builder and has a good friend named vince cunetto. black is aware of cunetto's skill in making repro telecaster bodies, pickguards, "aged" tele blackguards, and a few "aged" fender replicas cunetto had built for himself. black shows one of cunetto's personal "aged" fender replicas to page who gives black and cunetto the green light to produce some "aged" replica samples. page likes what he sees and lets black and cunetto (who was not then and never becomes a fender custom shop employee) show two "aged" prototypes at the 1995 winter namm show. they are a hit (meaning dealers are willing to place orders). these "aged" replica prototypes give birth to the fender relic.the 1995 custom shop, however, is not prepared to produce the new relics. page decides to outsource the instrument components that need to be "aged" to the originator, vince cunetto, and in april of 1995, cunetto sets up shop under the name, "cunetto creative resources, inc.," in bolivar, missouri (his wife's hometown) to produce the components. cunetto's new shop receives its first shipment of raw bodies, necks and parts from the custom shop at the end of may, 1995. on june 27, 1995, cunetto ships the first reliced components back to the custom shop -- enough parts to produce twenty reliced nocasters.  cunetto describes the role he and his shop played in the production of the relics from 1995 through may of 1999: our work involved complete prep, finishing and cosmetic distressing of necks and bodies. we also aged and distressed all hardware, pickguards and metal parts. we got it down to a 20 piece per week schedule, and every friday we'd lay out the week's guitars on a large, 24-foot padded table. every single part on the guitar was then matched for visual consistency and appearance. we'd match necks to bodies, wear on guards to wear patterns on necks, hardware to body wear and on and on. each part of each guitar was then labeled so that they'd be sure to be assembled as a unit after being packed and sent to corona for final assembly. relic order numbers continued to grow, as did the number of custom and one-off orders. in may of '96, we moved the company to a larger, better-equipped facility and continued production. as efficiency and employee training improved, so did our shipping numbers. we also upped the number of customs and one-offs produced.  production continued in the new facility. over the course of '97, as orders for the regular relics began to stabilize and taper, we began work on a new idea for the relics, which we dubbed "the relic classic". the concept was simple: a nicely "aged" guitar in good shape. we'd had requests for pieces like this in custom orders and had done a few prototypes for [the] custom shop, which were well received. in late '97, the "relic classic" became the "closet classic", but fender decided that it was a little late to get it ready for january '98 namm. plans had already been made to re-tool and change the specs of the "time machine" custom shop guitars over the course of '98, and the new relic model would be put off until later.  vince comment: by the latter part of '98, [the] custom shop had seen a lot of changes. john page had left to run the fender museum. because of new custom shop management and corporate policies, it was decided that the closet classics would be done in-house at custom shop. we continued to do the majority of the "standard" relics during '98, although there were a few done "in-house" as custom shop honed their "relicing" chops by early '99, things at custom shop had changed quite a bit, and i had a pretty strong feeling that they'd changed enough that using an outside vendor didn't make sense for custom shop. in march of this year [1999], i got a call from mike eldred, the new custom shop manager, informing me that they intended to do all relics in-house after we finished the then-current back order. that was it, and we shipped the last "cunetto relics" in may of 1999.the stratocaster relics in which cunetto and his shop played a role in producing (in addition to various telecaster and bass models), have come to be known on the street as "cunetto relics" and are receiving ever growing attention from buyers, players and collectors. while instruments from the time machine series produced today may be more historically accurate, it is believed by many that the care and attention given to the parts "aged" by cunetto and his shop distinguish those earlier instruments from their current descendants. they are becoming collectibles. vince cunetto, however, would like for stratocaster enthusiasts to know and remember the role he and his staff played in the production of the "cunetto relics":  vince cunetto comment: again, let me clarify our involvement. my company did not "make" or "build" the relics. we did not cut bodies or necks. we did not make the parts and we did not assemble them, set them up, etc. we sent all the parts back to [the] custom shop, where they were assembled, wired and shipped. somewhere along the line, the word got out that we'd been doing them, and my name became associated with the guitars from the inception to early-mid '99. the point is, i don't really care who gets the credit for the guitars or whose name is associated with them. all i really care about is the fact that me and my team put every bit of heart and soul we had every day into those guitars... to try to make each and every one have a "connection" on some level to anybody that picked it up.the growing interest in "cunetto relics" indicates that the connection was made. from the telecaster discussion board by vince cunetto himself: since there seem to be questions out there regarding the who, what when and were of the relics, i thought i'd do my best to try to set the story straight in a nutshell. i'd be happy to respond to any posts that come up regarding anything in here! the concept of the relics came out of conversations between my good friend jay black (custom shop master builder  j.w. black at the time/known for his relation with ec) and myself in late 1994 after i'd sent him a couple of "aged" blackguards for a friend's old tele. jay and i had known each other for years, so he was familiar with my work making repro tele bodies and pickguards, as well as the "aged" fender replicas i'd built for myself. jay and i reasoned that if people bought distressed leather jacket, jeans and reproduction antiques, why not guitars? i sent one of my personal "relics" to jay, who showed it to john page. being the bright guy he is, john saw the potential of the project and gave us permission to go ahead with building some samples to see what we'd get. i started receiving parts and painting the prototypes in my garage! the first cunettos: by the end of december 1994 or early january '95, i'd finished a couple of prototypes that page liked. he took a risk on this "wacky" idea and, without telling anyone, gave jay and i approval to show them at '95 namm. we finished the final show prototypes in january '95 in just in time for namm. with a great deal of surprise to many fender folks, the two relic prototypes were specially presented "center stage" under custom-made glass displays. it was a blast for john, jay and myself. we smiled more than several times when we'd hear dealers comment on "how cool it was that we included real old fender's as a tribute" as their reps toured displays with them and wrote orders. it was even more fun when we'd see the dealer's jaws drop as the rep would reply "cool old guitars, huh? how many would you like?" now we had to figure out how to make them, and keep them "real" on a production basis. after a few failed attempts at custom shop and a serious business proposal, i convinced john that the best thing for the project would be for me to set up a company as an outside vendor to specialize in doing nothing but the relics. this wasn't such a stretch for custom shop, as they were used to using vendors for special engraving, aluminum bodies, carvings and a lot of the intricate "artwork"that went into many of the custom shop pieces. we saw the artwork required for the relics as being no different'on a handshake with john page, in april of '95, i moved my family to my wife 's hometown of bolivar, missouri, near springfield, to set up shop under the banner of cunetto creative resources, inc., the consulting company i operated in colorado. i found a building, set up booths and equipment and hired and trained employees. first batch: we began to receive raw bodies, necks and parts at the end of may 1995. the first shipment  from the new facility, 20 relic nocasters, went on the truck on june 27, 1995.how it worked: as a matter of course, we'd receive raw necks and bodies and all parts from custom shop. our work involved complete prep, finishing and cosmetic distressing of necks and bodies. we also aged and distressed all hardware, pickguards and metal parts. we got it down to a 20 piece per week schedule, and every friday we'd lay out the week's guitars on a large, 24-foot padded table. every single part on the guitar was then matched for visual consistency andappearance. we'd match necks to bodies, wear on guards to wear patterns on necks, hardware to body wear and on and on. each part of each guitar was then labeled so that they'd be sure to be assembled as a unit after being packed and sent to corona for final assembly. relic order numbers continued to grow, as did the number of custom and one-off orders. in may of '96, we moved the company to a larger, better-equipped facility and continued production. as efficiency and employee training improved, so did our shipping numbers. we also upped the number of customs and one-offs produced. production continued in the new facility. new ideas over the course of '97, as orders for the regular relics began to stabilize and taper, we began work on a new idea for the relics, which we dubbed "the relic classic". the concept was simple: a nicely "aged" guitar in good shape. we'd had requests for pieces like this in custom orders and had done a few prototypes for custom shop, which were well received. in late '97, the "relic classic" became the "closet classic", but fender decided that it was a little late to get it ready for january '98 namm. plans had already been made to re-tool and change the specs of the "time machine" custom shop guitars over the course of '98, and the new relic model would be put off until later.changes: by the latter part of '98, custom shop had seen a lot of changes. john page had left to run the fender museum. because of new custom shop management and corporate policies, it was decided that the closet classics would be done in-house at custom shop. we continued to do the majority of the "standard" relics during '98, although there were a few done "in-house" as custom shop honed their "relicing" chops.by early '99, things at custom shop had changed quite a bit, and i had a pretty strong feeling that they'd changed enough that using an outside vendor didn't make sense for custom shop. in march of this year, i got a call from mike eldred, the new custom shop manager, informing me that they intended to do all relics in-house after we finished the then-current back order. that was it, and we shipped the last "cunetto relics" in may of 1999.from june of '95 to may of '99, 860 "line" (not including custom) nocasters were shipped to fender, with a total of 44 nocasters shipped from us from january to may of this year.(1995)relic nocaster specs: original cunetto series:
relic rumours clarified:rumor: relic production began in january of 1995: false. the first production batch of relicsshipped from my facility on june 27, 1995. they probably shipped to dealers  from custom shop bymid july.rumor: until this year, the relic "aging process" was not done at custom shop, but farmed out toan out of state vendor: truerumor: those relics were painted with a true old-fashioned 100% top-to-bottom nitrocellulose lacquer finish: true and false. the color coats of the metallics and andsome plain custom colors were dupont lucite acrylic lacquer (just like the later, post "duco" originals!) over a nitro basecoat and finished with a nitro clear coat. all blonde and sunburst finishes, as well as fiesta red, oly white and daphne blue are 100% nitro.rumor: relic body wood was specially baked to improve dryness and resonance: falserumor: relics were dragged behind trucks to age them: false (lol)rumor: the ultra-thin relic finish has a great deal to do with the tone of the instruments: truerumor: many famous rock and country stars use relics regularly: true. but wecan't tell you who they are! there you have (some) of it folks! 


enjoy the huge, high-res photos below...



please check out our other listings, and visit  

the-guitar-dude.com

for exclusive deals & pricing!


buy with confidence. the dude offers a "no hassle return policy."

if you are not 100% thrilled with your purchase, 

simply return it for a full refund. no tricks or hassles.


all items can be shipped internationally. buyer is responsible for all import duties.

please contact the dude for an accurate shipping quote.


do you need 30 days or so to pay? ask about the "super-chill lay-away plan." 

the dude can build a custom-payment-plan that will work for you.


all guitars ship on the first business day once payment clears.

the "dude" never disappoints!!

 



any questions? 

call  art the "dude"

 the guitar dude

weston, fl

(954) 448-2413


please check us out & "like" us on facebook

feel free to post pictures/video of your guitars or band on my  "timeline" page! 


facebook.com/therealguitardude



   


and follow on instagram


user name : @theguitardude
































please check out our other listings, and visit  

the-guitar-dude.com

for exclusive deals & pricing!


buy with confidence. the dude offers a "no hassle return policy."

if you are not 100% thrilled with your purchase, 

simply return it for a full refund. no tricks or hassles.


all items can be shipped internationally. buyer is responsible for all import duties.

please contact the dude for an accurate shipping quote.


do you need 30 days or so to pay? ask about the "super-chill lay-away plan." 

the dude can build a custom-payment-plan that will work for you.


all guitars ship on the first business day once payment clears.

the "dude" never disappoints!!

 



any questions? 

call  art the "dude"

 the guitar dude

weston, fl

(954) 448-2413


please check us out & "like" us on facebook

feel free to post pictures/video of your guitars or band on my  "timeline" page! 


facebook.com/therealguitardude



   


and follow on instagram


user name : @theguitardude








posted with ebay mobile